Guys guide to dating a geek girl

A majority of the fifty articles on this topic I’ve come across over the past few months have been less than enlightened, and advocate people relinquishing any sense of self-identity and self-respect to attract a certain type of person.

In fact, when I inquired about blogging for the team here, they were excited to have a non-geek on board.

It's like a man telling a stunning woman how beautiful she is. Now, genuinely praise her for some other ability, and she's listening hard! You don't need to share his love of Star Trek, but never (ever ever) diss Leonard Nimoy.

Laughing at Sheldon's crazy quirks is fun so long as he's on TV, but not if you're dating him IRL.

Instead, use it to grow closer, share experiences and discover new things. Go buy a nice pair of jeans and a top that isn’t from Threadless and walk confidently.

Then, get a haircut that brings out your best features.

As a scientist and closet nerd, I’ve known my share of nerdy men. When some women date nerds, they tend to focus on the “negative” side of his nerd-dom (e.g. You may have different interests, but one way to spend quality time with your nerdy guy is to watch sci-fi movies or TV shows that also appeal to female non-nerds. Immensely popular, Game of Thrones chronicles seven noble families fighting for control of a mythical land. Based on a trilogy of books, the first Hunger Games movie was a big success and they’re in the process of making the second.

Earlier this year, the guy I am currently dating–who would be proud to label himself a “geek guy”–forwarded this article to me (How To Date A Geek Guy: Offensive Advice Or a Smart How-To For Women? Being objectified and stereotyped, and dehumanized in the process, is not strictly a topic for frustrated feminist rants. This article addresses the idea that it may not be offensive, but rather helpful to women in understanding more about how geeky guys work. It encourages stereotypes and learning how to pretend to be someone you’re not in order to attract someone you have to work to click with.

You’ll have to excuse me while I laugh at that double-standard. The alternative (realizing that successful relationships are about organically bonding with someone who seems like a natural match) is a lot more difficult and doesn’t sell magazines or garner traffic.

But after a few dates, you begin to realize he’s not like the other guys you’ve dated.

He’s smart; he’s a little shy; he’s quirky; and he loves science fiction, online gaming, comic books, or other related pursuits. While nerds often make great partners (in fact, many of us in the dating business consider them the unsung heroes of the single male demographic), women tend to overlook them.